Grand Cayman is the largest of the three Cayman islands. Its about 35 km long and 5km wide. Tourism is huge in GC, mostly from Americans and it has the reputation of being a top tax haven.  The island is not too crowded  (not more than for example  Texel in the North of Holland). At least not the eastern side that I visited  in January  2008  with a workshop of Alex Mustard. We stayed  at the Compass point dive resort at the  South eastern part of the island that has nice arrangements for divers. GC underwater is famous  for its variety of huge colourful sponges: tube, rope,  vase, elephant ear and  finger  sponges, just name it. It also has wrecks, mostly at  the Western side, and pinnacles, tunnels and caves with school of silversides in the late summer months.  And..  it has Stingray City as its top tourist attraction.  Excessive feeding has made the huge stingrays (Dasyatis americana) at the shallow sandy bottom completely dependend on daily boat visits. Which made them eager to approach, and even being cuddled by the  visitors.  A visit  in the very early morning when the tourist boats have not yet arrived  is the only option for the UW photographers. Its a snorkeling trip, so no strobes are required, perhaps only a filter on your camera.

And then there are the numerous jacks, snappers, grunts, gray angelfish, tarpon,  nassau groupers, and even sharks.  For photographers the tunnels, arches and caves offer splendid opportunities for wide angle shots. They are not too deep, with light rays penetrating  in the crevices  and spots of blue at the end of a tunnel or cave. Schools of snappers or silversides are often resting in its shelters or passing through.  The caverns are also the right place to try out some tricks with your slave strobes. Since 2011 it  possible to visit the wreck Kittiwake, a former US navy vessel  that was  sunk deliberately to form an artificial reef, and has since then become a 'hot'' spot for divers and wide angle photographers.

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